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Birch Bark Bait Box
Birch Bark Bait Box can be found here:

http://www.ooklnet.com/web/read_more/280501/Birch+Bark+Bait+Box

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Gammelgarden Museum
20880 Olinda Trail
Scandia, MN
55073
United States

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Birch Bark Bait Box

This birch bark box was constructed to hold bait for fishing. Birch bark has many uses because it is pliable, waterproof and the chemical properties of birch bark have preservative qualities. This box slides open from the handle and a fisher-person would fill it with moss and nightcrawlers. Then the lid was closed and the handle could be strapped to a belt until you reached the fishing hole. The nightcrawlers would stay moist and fresh for the fish.
Did you know?
Swedish Immigrants brought their knowledge of wood construction with them when they came to America. Birch bark was used to make many sizes of tightly covered, oval-shaped boxes that held their silver, needles and pins. The preservative properties of the tanins in the birch bark kept metals from tarnishing! The birch bark boxes (tina or loda in Swedish) were also used to hold perishables such as coffee, tea, dried fruits and grains.
Birch Bark Bait Box - used to hold nightcrawlers for fishing when hiking to your favorite fishing hole.
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Where is it located?
This Birch Bark Box is one of the artifacts in the Immigrant Hus on the grounds of the Gammelgarden Museum.
Who made it?
Where it was made?
Somewhere in the woods around St Croix Valley.
When it was made?
How it was made?
What it was made from?
 
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