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Battlebridge Basin
Battlebridge Basin can be found here:

http://www.ooklnet.com/web/read_more/280258/Battlebridge+Basin

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London Canal Museum
12-13 New Wharf Road King's Cross
London N1 9RT
United Kingdom

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Battlebridge Basin

Battlebridge Basin is one of the largest basins along Regent's Canal. It was originally called 'Horsfall Basin,' (after its owner, William Horsfall) and was opened around 1823. The basin offers mooring to numerous narrowboats, and the occasional barge still passes through. It was used to unload ice to Gatti's ice warehouse. Throughout most of the 20th Century, it was dominated by Paistowe and Co, a manufacturer of jam and marmalade. The fruit is thought to have come from the London docks, by canal boat.

A canal basin is an expanse, to the side or at the end of a canal, allowing boats to moor or unload cargo, without slowing boat traffic along the canal. A basin was often associated with wharves along its perimeter, used by commercial boats. Today, basins are used more often by residential narrowboat owners. Most of the boats in Battlebridge Basin are residential. Although small, modern floating homes offer all the comforts of modern life, unlike the small cabins in which the working boat people had to live.

Did you know?
The basin is built up from the naturally sloping level of the land. It has an embankment around it, which was built using the spoil from nearby Islington Tunnel. The water is therefore at a higher level than New Wharf Road and this is why you have to go up steps to the level of the side of the basin.
Battlebridge Basin has an industrial past but is now mostly used for residential narrowboats.
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Ground Floor, outside
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King's Cross
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