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Teaset
Teaset can be found here:

http://www.ooklnet.com/web/read_more/253577/Teaset

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Museums Sheffield
Leader House
Surrey Street
Sheffield, South Yorkshire
S1 2LH
United Kingdom

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Teaset

Who made this tea set?
This tea set was designed by David Mellor in 1958 and manufactured by Walker & Hall of Sheffield, who employed Mellor as a design consultant from 1954. The name of the pattern is Pride. Mellor also designed a place setting in this pattern. The Pride tea set was highly regarded and achieved a prestigious award from London's Design Centre.

The tea set is composed of a teapot, hot water jug, cream jug and sugar bowl. It is made from EPNS and has handles and knops made from black nylon (a form of plastic). It retailed at £26 2 shillings. The design was originally manufactured in silver with handles covered in black leather. This would have been much more expensive than the later EPNS version.

A contemporary opinion…
The Pride tea set is illustrated in a 1959 publication of The Design Centre. It is described as follows:

"Electro-plate has here been given the attention which, until recently, was thought worthy only of silver. The set is not only distinguished in its appearance - the sugar bowl and milk jug are as well shaped as the tea-pot; it is also designed for maximum usefulness. The lids are interchangeable and the nylon handles, which are hard wearing and heat resistant, are large enough to prevent the user's hand from touching the metal - an obvious point, but one that is frequently overlooked".

What is The Design Centre?
The Design Centre was opened in 1957 in London's Haymarket. Its aim was to demonstrate to an increasingly consumer conscious public that well designed products could improve their lives. At this time, design for the home was growing in importance and popularity.

By the mid 1950s highly regarded designers such as Gerald Benney and David Mellor were working with large Sheffield manufacturers, for example, Viners and Walker & Hall. These designer goods were mass produced in EPNS and had a wide market appeal. They proved to be incredibly popular with fashion conscious consumers.

About the designer…
David Mellor was born in Sheffield in 1930. He first trained at the prestigious Sheffield School of Art from 1946 to 1948 and continued his studies at the Royal College of Art in London until 1954.

After his graduation, Mellor returned to Sheffield determined to make a difference to industrial design. In 1957 the Design Centre was opened in Haymarket to show a newly consumer conscious British public how well designed products could improve their lives. At this period design for the home was newsworthy, receiving substantial coverage in daily and Sunday papers as well as in women's magazines.

Iconic designs by David Mellor include Embassy cutlery, flatware and tea sets, plastic cutlery and flatware for Cross Paperware Ltd and the innovative Minimal cutlery set of 2003. In 1973 Mellor was commissioned by the Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire to produce a silver handmade bowl to celebrate the bicentenary of Sheffield Assay Office.

Today, David Mellor's son, Corin, continues to design and produce cutlery from the award winning The Round Building in Hathersage, near Sheffield.


Did you know?
The tea set is composed of a teapot, hot water jug, cream jug and sugar bowl. It is made from EPNS and has handles and knops made from black nylon (a form of plastic). It retailed at £26 2 shillings. The design was originally manufactured in silver with handles covered in black leather. This would have been much more expensive than the later EPNS version.
Who made this tea set?<br/>This tea set was designed by David Mellor in 1958 and manufactured by Walker & Hall of Sheffield, who employed Mellor as a design consultant from 1954. The name of the pattern is Pride. Mellor also designed a place setting in this pattern. The Pride tea set was highly regarded and achieved a prestigious award from London\
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