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Native Police
Native Police can be found here:

http://www.ooklnet.com/web/read_more/280512/Native+Police

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Old Treasury Building
Old Treasury Building,
Spring Street
Melbourne, VIC
3000
Australia

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Native Police

Warning. This article may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased.

The Native Police Corp was established in 1942, under the command of Henry E. Pulteney Dana at the Aboriginal Protectorate Station at Narre Narre Warren. This was a mounted police consisting 45 Aboriginal troopers and 15 European officers. The goals of the Corp were to use the native peoples knowledge of the land and to assimilate the troopers into white society. The troopers were primarily used for tracking missing persons or escaped convicts, escorting through the unfamiliar territory of Australia, delivering mail and policing the goldfields during the gold rush.

Troopers were provided with firearms, uniforms, a meager salary and food rations. These small offerings were often enough for the troopers to be able to support their extended family.

The Native Police was of great use during the Victorian gold rush. In 1849 they were sent to Daisy Hill to guard a section of Crown Lands, a site of gold discovery to ensure the regions citizens did not try to claim the land for themselves. They were the first government authority at Mt Alexander during the gold rush, and they escorted the first convoy to deliver gold from the goldfields to Melbourne. Those that didn’t leave the corps for the diggings became the law enforcers on the goldfields, including administering the license fee which became the reason behind the Eureka rebellion.

After the death of Commandant Dana in 1852 the Corps gradually dissolved. With the Victorian Police force created in 1953 there was seen to be no need for the Native Police. Aboriginal trackers are still being consulted to this day by the Police force.

Did you know?
A man named Neighbour was the first Aboriginal to be presented with the highest award for police officers. He was awarded the Albert Medal for Bravery when he rescued a police officer from the Wilton river when it flooded in 1911. Afterwards Neighbour worked as a tracker with the Northern Territory Police.
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The Native Police Corp was established in 1942, under the command of Henry E. Pulteney Dana at the Aboriginal Protectorate Station at Narre Narre Warren. This was a mounted police consisting 45 Aboriginal troopers and 15 European officers. It was Victoria’s first police force.
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Where is it located?
Indigenous History
 
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